click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 90
LANGUAGE
English 90
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)
continues, with more efforts to cool down the reactors. what they are doing is using chinook helicopters to drop sea water. they have been addressing the media, just about one hour ago. here is what was said. >> the two leaders talked to each other on the phone, from 10:22 a.m. to 10:52 a.m. president barack obama expressed symphony -- sympathy, and he also offered support, including support related to nuclear power plants and also mid-term and long-term rehabilitation initiatives. prime minister kan expressed gratitude to president obama for his support. the self-defense forces and police, all of those who are concerned are doing their best, and the prime minister can explain this to president obama. the people in charge of disaster relief and operations are doing their best, and also, the two leaders agreed to cooperate on the nuclear power plant issues. >> mr. edano has really been the face of this crisis, addressing the media every day, and here is what he had to say about the latest thames -- the latest attempts to drop the sea water to cool them. >> to drop water from the air, and
have joined us. our conversation with susan jacoby, coming up. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference -- >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. >> nationwide is on your side >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: susan jacoby is a best- selling author. her latest is "never say die: the myth and marketing of the new old age." susan jacoby, a bit too heavy on this program. >> wonderful to be here. tavis: led to heavy. tell me about the marketing of this new old age. i see these commercials all the time on television, people running through gardens. >> it is called age defying. it
is now valued at over $7 billion. we're glad you have joined us. a conversation with twitter co-founder biz stone coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer. nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literatey and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one nation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: biz stone is of course a successfulntrepreneur who five years ago this week joined forces with two partners to form something called twitter. five years later, the social networking site is one of the most influential and widely used form of communication in the world. recently he signed on as a strategic advisor with a.o.l. and the huffington post media group. we'll hav
. >> tell us a little about supplies. what is day to day life like in terms of food and water and electricity, and just getting around town? >> the situation in northeastern japan is quite desperate. although, my son, who has just come back to us from sendai, closer in to the city, told us infrastructure is starting to be restored. you walk into tokyo, and there are no neon lights, and there much fewer people walking around the town. it is a bizarre, unsettling atmosphere. >> are people in an orderly fashion, or are they panicky? >> i would say in a lot of senses, this is japanese population's finest hour. in tokyo, as i mentioned earlier, there is a great frustration and anxiety level, but there are also a lot of people saying, you know, we have to pull ourselves together. >> you can hear my complete conversation with lucy, including more on her son's ordeal, on our website, nbron meanwhile, concerns about those damaged nuclear reactors in japan spooked investor confidence, and stock markets around the world sold off. here in the u.s., the panic- selling swept through wall st
are living through glorious hours. all of the people are with us. i say to you i am not afraid. not afraid of the planes that caused such destruction. i am defiant. my home is here. i am here. i am here. >> even as he was speaking the words, on american tv came the suggestion that perhaps the gadhafi regime is exploring options internationalally. >> i am not aware he personally has reached out but i do know that people allegedly on his behalf have been reaching out. this is a very dynamic situation. >> so far u.s. forces have taken a prominent role in the u.n. authorized operation. barack obama made it clear that soon increasingly fewer american planes will be involved. >> i would expect that over the next several days we will have clarity and a meeting of the minds with all those participating in the process. we are already seeing a significant reduction in the number of u.s. planes involved in operations over libya. >> and this is the result of those operations, a workshop on a military base where an officer told the bbc overnight bombing caused some destruction but nobody died. elsewher
to step down. but in an exclusive interview, libyan's colonel gaddafi came out fighting. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. said that he was delusional. >> it was colonel gaddafi's first interview since this crisis started. he agreed to see bbc news and the sunday times. he said that the u.n.sanction resolutions against libyan were illegitima illegitimate. and asked if he would leave the country. [laughter] as if anyone would leave their home land, he said. >> mr. gaddafi, you have been known as the leader, and for years. and plenty of people in this country would say that the biggest obstacle of change for them and libya is you. >> he said that his presence actually instigated change for the people. >> in recent years you have had important western leaders like tony blair coming here. and now there are western leers leaders saying you should go. >> of course it's betrayal, they have no morals, besides if they want me to step down, what do i step down from? i am not a monarch or king. >> but you can step down even if you don't have a formal title. >> it's honor, he said, nothing to
in the u.s., the financial markets ignored those debt concerns. but erika miller looks at why american investors may want to pay attention to the crisis in portugal. >> reporter: for the past few weeks, investors have had plenty of distractions, ranging from political upheaval in egypt and libya to natural disasters and nuclear problems in japan to sharply higher oil prices. but today, the spotlight was on a problem many thought had gone away-- the european debt crisis. the fall of the portuguese government has pushed that country's borrowing rates to record levels, making it more difficult for portugal to get a handle on it's debt. economist brian levitt says the fear in financial markets is that portugal could need an expensive bailout. >> the big fear about the fall of the government in portugal is that they are not going to go through the austerity measures that they need, that the larger euro-economies want for them to go through in order to get additional credit facilities. >> reporter: another fear is contagion, reinforced by credit rating agency moody's downgrade of more than 3
of the people are with us. we will have a revolution against imperialism. i am not afraid of the planes that cause destruction. i am defined. my home is here. i am here, i am here, i am here. >> even as he was speaking these words, on american television came the suggestion that perhaps the regime is trying to explore its options internationally. >> i am not aware that he personally has reached out, but i do know that people allegedly on his behalf have been reaching out. so that is why i say this is a very dynamic situation. >> so far, u.s. forces have taken a prominent role in un authorized operation. after our phone conversation with david cameron and nicolas sarkozy, barack obama made clear that soon increasingly fewer american planes will be involved appeared >> i would expect that over the next several days, we will have clarity and a meeting of the minds of all those participating in the process. we are seeing a significant reduction in the number of u.s. planes involved in operations over libya appeared >> this is the result. a workshop on the military base in tripoli. overnight
in u.s. history with former assistant secretary of defense and vietnam veteran bing west. in his book, he offers a speeding critique and says the u.s. military should not be in the business of nation-building. his new book is called "the wrong war." our conversation with bing west coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: as i mentioned at the top, the war in afghanistan is in its 10th year, making it the longest in u.s. history. among those who question u.s. currency and policy for years now is bing west. his new book on the subject is called "the wrong war." i
warren christopher. there is the subject of diplomacy. the u.s. is now engaged in three wars in three different muslim countries. the issue of diplomacy has never been more critical, it seems. we are glad you are joining us, including a look back at our interview with warren christopher, right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference -- >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. kcet public television] tavis: a few programming notes. tomorrow night on the program, we will take a look at the relief and recovery operations in japan with architect hitoshi abe and a conversation with known play right eve ensler. later this week, a co-founder of
details to emerge. we have not seen the word defection use by the foreign office but there is no doubt that this is a senior figure turning his back on it gaddafi. >> the bbc's world affairs editor is in tripoli. he says that colonel gaddafi is going to be too concerned by the resignation. >> this will have an impact but we have to remember that gaddafi has lost plenty of ministers before. his interior minister is now a senior figure in benghazi. there have been others as well. my guess is that they will stop this off. whether moussa koussa will be such a gain to the rebels and their representatives in london is uncertain. we must remember that some people have been in accusing him of involvement with the lockerbie bombing, for instance. he was the head of intelligence for colonel gaddafi. that is not a neutral post. nevertheless, it means that they're going to be people are around colonel gaddafi that will be thinking now about their future is very carefully. but at the same time, this is really a one horse government. it is all about colonel gaddafi and those people who are loyal to
as global tensions heat up. >> it definitely gives us a moment to pause and reflect and actually take stock of where value really is in the capital markets. >> stock prices dropping 2% today is just an opportunity to pick them up a little cheaper. >> susie: we talk challenges and opportunities in stocks with a market bull and a market bear. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, march 10. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening. investors haven't seen a sell- off in stocks like today's since last summer. several worries were pressuring the markets today, violence in saudi arabia and renewed concerns about europe among them, susie. >> susie: tom, adding to the jitters-- worries about china's economic growth, and some disappointing news about the u.s. job market. the selling was broad-based-- the dow fell 228 points, closing below the 12,000 level; the n
brega, they planned to head on. news of the attack 40 miles away reached us in the early morning. defenders started preparing for the possibility that gaddafi's forces would roll straight on and try to capture the space. -- this base. they were excited and nervous. defenders here have a few ancient russian takes -- tanks which the rolled out, older and less effective than the tanks which khaddafi forces are apparently using. many of these men are not just untrained volunteers. until a few days ago, they had been soldiers. the mood was defiant. "we have decided there is only one with for us to go," he shouted, "and that is the representative with forward." flying close by, and air force jet, probably russian built. this is the fourth attempt in 12 days to blow up the ammunition store. this is the entrance through which gaddafi troops are supposed to advance. people are very acceptable, as you can imagine. as it turned out, the gaddafi forces or not at the gates. they were still slugging it out at brega, where they had captured the airfield. at that moment, the plane came around fo
range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> president obama says the u.s. and nato are still considering their options for lydia, including military intervention. >> i want to send a clear message to those around colonel gaddafi. it is their choice to make how they will be held accountable. >> gaddafi's troops to retake territory after a day of sustained attacks. >> [inaudible] çquite a success for colonel gaddafi's army. >> the un says 200,000 people have fled the violence in libya. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. washington reintroduce this military trials at guantanamo bay despite anç earlier promise to close it down. the party is over for the highest-paid actor on american television. charlie sheen is sacked from his, a program. ç>> the six gulf states includg saudi arabia have called on the un security council to implement a no-fly zone over libya. the un needed to protect libyan citizens. earlier president obama said the u.s. and allies are stillç considering a military response to the situation
of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention around the world is also shifting to the economic consequences of the disaster. many economists believe the country is likely to slide into recession. so what will that mean for the rest of the world? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: there's no question the human toll of japan's epic earthquake and tsunam
in u.s. treasuries. >> tom: we ask pimco's bill gross why he's bailing out of government debt and where he's putting money now. you're watching "nightly business" report for wednesday, march 9. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the world's largest bond fund is betting against bonds. pimco's total return fund has sold off its government bond holdings to zero as of the end of february. tom, this is a strong signal from pimco's flagship fund that it sees little value in owning u.s. treasuries. >> tom: susie, as a result of those bond sales, pimco is sitting on $54 billion of cash. the fund still owns other kinds of bonds. it's holdings are diversified among mortgage bonds, corporate debt, foreign bonds and municipal securities. >> susie: so what's the reason behind the bond fire sale? joining us now: william gross, the founder and co-chief investment officer of pimco. hi, bill,
. >> everyone making a difference? you help us all live better. >> nationwide difference supports tavis smiley with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis smiley and remove obstacles to economic empowerment. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: welcome ed o'neill back to this program and is one of the most popular shows "modern family." it took home the emmy last year for best comedy. here now a scene from "modern family." >> what are you doing here? >> i'm just returning that crock pot that gloria borrowed. >> i forgot you had that crock pot, jay. we are getting ready to build a christmas castle. >> sure. >> remember, how much fun we had building that book shelf together? >> that was my vietnam. and i was in vietnam. >> oh, look at us, three construction dudes. dad, i'm going to get you workman gloves, blue or camel, what's your preference? >> surprise me. tavis: you are the most diverse head of the household. your family is all over the place. >> yeah. tavis: you are diversity. >
to be an interceptive phone call, supposedly between the u.s. ambassador and a rebel general in the east. >> this is ambassador gene crist talking to you. >> what equipment do you have? >> it's not clear what exactly the american diplomat, if it was him, was offering. >> if they want to support the militia, do it. and we are not afraid. america, nato, france. it is our country. we live here, we die here. we will never, ever surrender to those terrorists. >> later in tripoli, colonel gaddafi's most prominent son addressed the quarters he called the real libyans. they were supposed to be libya's future, until the rebellion. as far as these people are concerned, that vision has been restored. the son will succeed the father. the rebels will be beaten. it feels like a victory rally. and he had a shot message for the rebels. we're coming. jeremy bowen, "bbc news," tripoli. >> nato has insisted that for a no-fly zone to be set up over libya, there would have to be strong regional support. on the diplomatic front, there has been a rather gloomy assessment in washington of the rebels' chance. th
not agree. >> they gave us pictures they failed to show us what happens. on friday, protesters tried to get into green square. security forces or shifting to kill. the regime says it will only open fire in self-defense. the protesters to stay away from state hospitals. gaddafi told the bbc that all the people loved him. not here. this is the grave of a 32-year- old killed last friday. he left a child and a pregnant wife. >>, the rebels in the east are preparing themselves for the possibility of a showdown with gaddafi. in a gauzy, there is the sort of men willing to volunteer, but there is no great enthusiasm for any military intervention by the western ties. >> everybody here -- they do not want military international. we saw what happened in iraq. >> further along the coast, there was more enthusiasm for the idea of a no-fly zone. for the rebels here, this guy is the danger. -- the sky is the danger. planes haveafi's been sent three times. everyone is scared that it will happen again. in fact, at two of the three pilots have been sent to attack have deliberately missed. that is released s
." >> president obama says the u.s. had a moral obligation to intervene in libya. they will now seek control of major operations to nato. >> i said america's role would be limited and we would not put ground troops into libya. we would focus our unique capabilities on the front end of the operation and transfer responsibility to our allies and partners. tonight, we are fulfilling that pledge. >> allied strikes on libya continue. the rebels he -- meet heavy resistance but pledged to continue their advance westward. >> i will hold gaddafi and kill him. >> fist fighting in the western city upper -- of misrata. we are broadcasting to our viewers in p.b.s. in america, and around the world. japan's prime minister declares a state of maximum alert over the crisis at the fukushima nuclear plant. president obama has made his first formal speech on the military campaign in libya. the address in washington came amid some criticism in the united states that the president has yet to explain what the goals of military action are and how long the military action will last. he responded by saying that a fai
to a democracy. we are waiting for more details to emerge. we haven't seen the word defection used but there is no doubt that it is a senior figure from the gadhafi regime turning his back on colnel gadhafi. >> the bbc's john simpson is in tripoli and says that gadhafi is not go to be moved with the news of his defection. >> you have to remember colnel gadhafi has lost ministers before. he is now a senior figure. there have been others as well. my guess is that they will shrug it off. and whether he will be really such a gain to you must remember some people have been accusing him of involvement of the bombing and he was head of intelligence. nevertheless of course there will be people around colnel gadhafi who'll be thinking about their futures carefully. but this is a one-horse government. it is all about colnel gadhafi and the people that are loyal to him. my guess is that they will feel their future are entirely bound up with him. >> rebels in libya are retreating in the face of a military advance by government forces. hundreds of fighters fled. they have already abandoned seve
around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of the area were urged to evacuate. >> susie: and tom, those warnings spooked u.s. stock investors, sendin
, they consider evee else as a renegade. they consider everybody is their enemy. they must kill us. these people have put their fingers in their ears so as not to hear. the fervent reaction to those listening to his words were clear for all to see. earlier, there was more evidence of the fighting that is putting his country. these pictures appear to show the situation a few days ago. government troops showing what they claim is rebel-held ammunition. rebel forces said the situation in the city is critical. with fierce battles taking place. >> we have got to prepare for what we might have to do if he goes on brutalizing his own people. i talked about the planning we continues and he does terrible things to his people. we can not stand aside and let that happen. >> missed british approach is something one politician has -- of this british approach is something one politician has welcome. >> i would also point out the assets gaddafi has are in a relatively small space around tripoli. a no-fly zone which is what the people of libya are putting four. >> i shall put the draft resolution to the boat. >
a difference, >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer. nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to pbs station from viewers your like you. thank you. kcet public television] >> sherry turkle is founder to have m.i.t. initiative on technology and self. her new book is called "alone together." why we expect more from technology and less from each other. she joins us tonight from boston. professor turkle, good to have you on this program. >> my pleasure. tavis: what do you mean? >> i mean we turn toward devices. we turn toward devices. we text with our devices but what we want back is a quick text. we don't necessarily want to speak with each other. we don't want really a close connection. we want something quick from each other and we can get more involved with the device and what it offers, this sense of close connections than really connecting with each othe
captioning sponsored by wpbt . >> disasters like this remind us of the common humanity we share. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states
us there is no risk to human health. here is is our correspondent. >> to an outsider, the scale of tokyo can be hard to take in. is stretches from horizon to horizon, an unbroken stretch of glass and concrete. 35 million people live here. as the wind blew into tokyo from the north today, the street emptied. more and more people are now wearing masks whenever they go out. the latest pictures from the fukushima nuclear plant are not likely to make anyone here feel more confident. the shattered reactor buildings seem to contradict all the government claims that the situation is under control. in the latest attempt to halt a meltdown, the army used helicopters to dry -- try and drop cooling water onto the damaged reactors above, but the howling winds and radiation level force to do to be abandoned. and in a sign of just how serious things are becoming, emperor akihito appeared on television to try and reassure his people. but people here are not reassured. at tokyo station we found families dashing to board trains south. people with small children seemed most eager to get out. what
of trading on a legal tip-off, now the biggest insider trading trial in u.s. history. police investigate an organized crime syndicate that operated around the world. hello there as forces step up offenses against rebel areas, president obama's top national security advisors meet to outline what steps are realistic. washington as underscored any authorization of a no-fly zone must come from a united nation security council. >> colnel kadafi presented a front since the rebellion in his country began and more evidence of the fighting that split libya. these pictures show the situation a few days ago. government troops showing off flashes of what they claim is rebel held a&m mission. rebel forces say the situation in the city is very critical with fierce battles taking place. >> i don't think we can stand aside to let that happen. >> this british approach is something one prominent american politician has welcomed. >> a no-fly zone account be imposed fairly easily, not without challenges, but i would also point out that the air assets that gadhafi has is in a small space. a no-fly zone is wh
fighters pushed back from the coastal town to regroup. support of the libyan leader has used tanks and artillery again as we are near the capital of tripoli. they sent to this. >> at dawn this morning, it was immediately clear that the rebel's enthusiasm was fading. it has carried them 150 miles westward along the coast, leading the troops back away. now their supply lines are stretched. his troops are starting to fight on more friendly territory. yesterday, we went with the rebels to the next town that they attacked fiercely. this morning, when we went up, we found that the rebels had faded away during the night. from a distance, we sought a checkpoint that we decided was probably manned by loyalists. it was. a couple of soldiers opened fire in our direction. >> keep your head down. >> we drove hastily down the road to the oil town captured by the rebels on friday night. today, far fewer were making a stand here. they are transported all the way back here. [gunfire] [overhead flying] >> as gunners blazed away, a russian-built sequoia came in for an attack. whether the pilot missed
you have joined us with mansour el-kikhia and kareem abdul-jabbar and coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: mansour el-kikhia, fled his homeland in libya in 1980 due to political persecution by muammar gaddafi. he remains a critic from -- he joins us tonight. good to have you on this program. >> thank you for having me. tavis: there are those who thought a couple weeks ago that by now gaddafi would have gone the way of mubarak in egypt. yet it appears if he is going to go, it ain't going to be no time soon. what do you make of that? >> it is normal. this is the -- mubarak would have stayed lon
. it will be released soon on dvd. join us for mary bell and oscar winner charles ferguson, coming up. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help but>> yes. >> to everyone making a qaeda difference -- >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: mary bell is serving her second term as president of the wisconsin education council, following more than 25 years as a teacher in the state. organization represents thousands in the state of wisconsin, and she joins us tonight from madison. mary bell, thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me, tavis. tavis: the latest. what is happening in wisconsin? >> the protesters have been part of the capital environment for almost two we
tokyo, our correspondent is joining us. tell us more if you can about this four-fold increase in the radiation levels which has been announced. how will that affect human health? >> well, in fact, it could be even higher than that. since we last spoke, we heard from a chief cabinet secretary and there is one report on one of the japanese news agencies 4ká site itselfwe3d and thismç ise development. he went on twwbdúpduy say, now o talking about levelsoioçñokç thn damage human health. that's the firstñcgyç time he . site itselfwibsm and thatwéc%]mr awaye3vw 1íoythe levels wou? people,wedr especiallyç peopleç tokyo, is thatñglv:e3ç theoo levels ofw+kvc;nw ó3wl the best way to reduce the exposure to radiation is to stay indoors. >> what will be concerning, as well, is the meteorological office is saying that the winds are blowing southwesterly, which ties into what you said about the area near tokyo, taking the ridiation towards you. >> yes, but i think what's very difficult for us to get a handle on is whether these are brief spikes or whethe
viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. new signs today the u.s. housing market still is struggling. susie, that's even as many parts of the economy are recovering. >> susie: tom, what got everyone concerned is the latest new home sales numbers. they fell to a record low. sales tumbled almost 17% in february. even lower prices couldn't bring in the buyers. the average selling price for a new home fell to $202,000. at the current sales pace, it would take almost nine months to sell all the new homes on the market. >> tom: this discouraging news comes right at the start of the spring selling season. erika miller reports. >> reporter: instead of eating during her lunch hour, angie moncada likes to go house hunting online. she and her husband have been waiting for spring to get serious about their search. >> we want to move somewhere around the beginning of june. also it seems like things are just picking up generally, and we're hoping that people who have been holding out on putting their homes on the market will be doing so now. >> rep
. >> welcome. as fierce fighting continues in libya, president obama has said he has not ruled out supplying u.s. weapons to opposition figures in the country. he also says he believes colonel gaddafi was losing control of his country would ultimately step down. speaking in a series of interviews on american news networks, president obama called on the leadership around colonel gaddafi to make it clear that he had to go. >> the circle around gaddafi understands that the noose is tightening, that their days are probably numbered. and they're going to have to think through what their next steps are. but as i have been very clear about throughout, there's certain things they can do that will send the signal that he's ready to go. until that time, we're going to keep on applying pressure and hopefully he's going to be getting the message soon. >> if gaddafi ends up in a villa someplace in zimbabwe with no war crimes trial, is that ok with you? >> well, you know, that's not going to be my decision alone. i will tell you, though, that the first step is for gaddafi to send a signal that he understands
and relatively modest increase in u.s. consumer price inflation. >> susie: the latest on inflation and what it'll take to end the fed's government bond buying binge. you're watching "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 1. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. ben bernanke said today the federal reserve is ready to take action if high oil prices threaten the economy. susie, the fed chief's comments came on a day when oil prices gushed higher. >> susie: tom, as bernanke was testifying on capitol hill in washington, oil futures trading here in new york surged to just below the $100 level. april crude rose $2.66 a barrel, or more than 2.5%. and those rising oil prices triggered a stock sell-off on wall street-- the dow fell 168 points, the nasdaq lost 44, and the s&p 500 off almost 22. >> tom: against that market backdrop, bernanke explain
to account. the big question is what the united states can actually do about libya short of using direct military force. we heard president obama pimm talk about preparing a full range of options. -- president obama talk about preparing a full range of options. the subtext is, if pushed to that point, but that is certainly not where the government is at this moment. it is a less preferred option. there has been a lot of talk about the no-fly zone over libya. that would require military action. the united states is not ruling that option out, but is very reluctant to commit to it. the reason for that is that the united states has commitments elsewhere, and also, even if military action is done in cooperation it with other military powers in europe, how will it be perceived by people in the middle east? >> and egyptian sarah jennings is inptian upsurge surgeon eastern libya. i spoke to him earlier and asked how long he had been there and what work he was doing. >> i have been in libya for a week now. we are offering of medical and surgical help to the libyan people that have been injured.
by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. president obama put libya on notice today saying the u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and will begin talking with opposition groups. that came after a vote at the united nations calling for a no- fly zone over the country. not surprisingly, oil markets were volatile today. crude prices closed down 35 cents to settle at $101 a barrel, off their high of $103. as suzanne pratt reports the oil market is coping with a long list of issues. >> reporter: in the past week much of the world has been fixated on japan, with one exception. the global oil market is paying much more attention to bubbling co
started with a heavy sandstorm. rebel commanders planned to use them to beef up their forces and prepare for an attack. with conditions as as this it is not surprising there is no military activity of any kind today. it looks as though both sides wanted to lick their wounds after last wednesday's battle. that turned out to be completely wrong. the commanders brought up some of their properly trained soldiers to take over the front- line posts from the untrained volunteers. the trouble was the volunteers decided to head on down the road towards another city. that left the train soldiers no alternative but to gather their gear and back them up. no preparation and no buildup of reserves. these are volunteers and not trained soldiers. they are all headed to the city 15 kilometers away from here. you can hear the sound of mortar fire. it was midafternoon and the battle lasted until dark. it will continue tomorrow by which time the rebels will have brought up several hundred more men. the odds will be a bit more favorable. >> the secretary general told the bbc it is preparing for old eventuali
tavis: good evening from los angeles, i'm tavis smiley. with the u.s. military now engaged in three separate conflicts in three muslim countries, there is a growing concern tonight about u.s. policy in the region and the priorities of the obama administration and so first up tonight, a conversation about the latest intervention in libya with richard haass, president of the council on foreign relations. also tonight, acclaimed artist and filmmaker julian schnabel is here, the director of "the diving bell and the butterfly" is out with a new film called "miral." it is said against with the israeli conflict in the middle east. glad you joined us, richard haass and filmmaker julian schnabel coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> e making a difference, you make us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in litter si and nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like
earthquake will do to japan's fragile economy and the global markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minutes after the earthquake hit. >> tom: we spoke with our correspondent in tokyo. and began by asking lucy craft what's the initial assessment of damage to businesses and industry in japan. >> companies hit quite hard. sony, hond on, toyota, the major auto makers have a lot of factories up in northeastern japan. there's been a range of damage to these companies. so those factories will be kind of knocked out of operation for various amounts of time. fortunately, the northeastern area of japan is very sparsely populated. this is -- if you compare this to the kobe earthquake of 16 years ago, it accounts for a much smaller amount of gdp. >> reporter: what have you learned about the damage to the trainl systems and infrastructure? >> we haven't heard about the damage to the train system which is a major source of transportation here. when you talk about energy, though, it's a whole different ball of wax, and there's a lot of different
joined us for a conversation with wynton marsalis coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and remove economic obstacles. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. kcet public television] tavis: always honored to have wynton marsalis on this program. the multiple award-winning jazz great heads a communication jazz outrich program all around this world. always good to see you. >> all the time. tavis: i was saying to the staff over the years doing this show, you have been on a number of times. never in the studio. >> it is nice here. tavis: always on a satellite feed. i'm glad to have you in l.a. how have you enjoyed your time in the disney hall? >> a lot. we recorded a piece i wrote. that's right here. we took the whole band. all of us having a great time. tavis: what do you make
. >> welcome to bbc world news. the headlines -- the u.s. to carry council? action against colonel gaddafi with a resolution to -- the un council backs action against colonel gaddafi with a resolution. celebrations in been gaungazi ae news of the resolution reaches the rebels. desperate for aid, more than 300,000 people are still homeless and food is in short supply. >> the united nations security council has approved a resolution for the creation of a no-fly zone to protect the people of libya. the resolution calls for all necessary measures, but rules out the use of foreign ground troops. 10 countries voted in favor and none were against. there were five abstentions, including russia and china. >> when it came, there was no opposition to the plan that britain, france, and 11 on had presented. sit -- significantly, both russia and china were among the five countries to abstain. afterwards, britain made clear why its government felt it had to act. >> the world should not stand by and accept the dump the hospitality against his own people. this resolution. tonight in the united nations secu
america." >> president obama says the u.s. has a moral obligation to intervene in libya. he will now have control. >> america's role will be limited. we will not put ground troops into libya, but we will focus our unique capabilities on the front and at transfer responsibility to our allies and partners. tonight, we are fulfilling that pledge. >> the rebels meet heavy resistance but about a continue the walk westward. there is fighting in the western city hall as pro gaddafi forces and get back partial control. thank you for joining us, coming up, a state of maximum alert over the crisis at the fukushima nuclear plant. ♪ using western military force to evict colonel gaddafi from power would be a mistake according to president obama, a military mission protecting civilians to include regime change would be counterproductive. he just came under some criticism that he hasn't properly explains the goals of the military action or how long it would last. >> there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gaddafi out of power. we will actively pursue that goal through no
but it rules out the use of foreign ground troops. there were five abstentions including china and russia. french officials have said that military action could begin within hours although britain has cautioned against that suggestion. >> there was no opposition to the plan that britain, france, and lebanon had presented. significantly, both russia and china were among the five countries to abstain. afterwards, britain made clear why the government felt they had to act. >> the world should not stand by and accept gaddafi promised brutality against his own people. this is an expression of the resolve. this is a resolve by the arab league last weekend and measures to protect and safeguard the civilian population of libya. >> france will contribute a strong contingent of those enforcing the no fly zone. their foreign minister told the security council that the world could not let the events continued unchecked. >> as i speak to you now, colonel gaddafi lost troops are continuing their violent reconquest of cities. we cannot let these warmongers do this. we cannot abandon the civilian populat
: good evening, and thanks for joining us. saying he wouldn't want to miss it, apple c.e.o. steve jobs was on stage in san francisco today, susie, where he introduced the new ipad 2. >> susie: tom, seeing jobs was a huge surprise, and he got a standing ovation. and then here on wall street, investors applauded the news; apple shares jumped nearly 2% in intra-day trading. apple fans and investors were happy to see a thin but energetic steve jobs. it was the c.e.o.'s first public appearance since taking medical leave in january. he called the ipad 2 "magical," saying the tablet is a thinner, lighter, faster powerhouse. it goes on sale march 11, and the new version starts at the same price as the original: $499. it also comes with both front and back cameras so you can shoot pictures and video. >> tom: apple's newest device enters a more crowded market than the original ipad, but "consumer reports" technology editor jeff fox says the ipad 2 has a huge head start on its android-based rivals. >> there's a lot more apps coming out now for the ipad. it has taken developers many months to prod
% for the first time in almost two years. >> tom: can the hiring continue? the outlook for the u.s. job market from two top economists. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 4. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. finally we got some good news today about the job market: strong business hiring in february. but tom, that was overshadowed by a big jump in oil prices. >> tom: susie, oil prices surged again today as anti-government protests continued in libya, bahrain and yemen. april crude futures now stand at $104 a barrel up $2.50 to more than a two-year high. but on the bright side, american businesses added 192,000 jobs in february-- the fastest pace of hiring since last may. the unemployment rate dropped to 8.9%-- the third straight monthly decline. >> susie: from wall street to main street, everyone's trying to figure out if the wo
to blend other fabrics together or stop using cotton. it's essential for the scrubs to be comfortable and soft. >> reporter: she's hoping customers won't mind paying a little more for extra touches. erika miller, "nightly business report," new york. >> tom: here are the stories in tonight's "n.b.r. newswheel." global food prices hit a record high in february, and the united nation's doesn't see them coming down soon. the u.n. says rising oil prices and food stockpiling by some nations could fuel further spikes. president obama and the president of mexico have agreed to end a fight over letting mexican trucks into the u.s. here's the deal-- if the trucks come in, mexico will drop $2 billion in tariffs on u.s. goods. our congress still has to sign off on it. if you carry on luggage when flying, you're costing uncle sam big bucks. t.s.a. screening of carry-on bags costs the federal government $260 million a year. the agency wants a hike in ticket security fees to cover those costs. still ahea- generation "y" is falling behind when it comes to investing. a look at the trend for those betw
>> tom: more than a week after air strikes began, what's the taxpayers' bill so far for u.s. military operations in libya? >> we've spent between $300 and $500 million, but as we move forward those costs should drop substantially. >> suzanne: as president obama talks to americans about libya, we'll look at how much money the conflict will cost the u.s., even as nato takes the lead. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 28. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by my colleague suzanne pratt. u.s. warplanes, ships and missiles have been striking against libya for more than a week. this evening, suzanne, president obama makes his case to the american people. that's after facing questions about the goals and costs of the mission. >> suzanne: and, tom, the president's speech come
to stop using violence. among the faithful, the enmity of the world only strengthens him. >> and the deputy foreign minister said that all military operations had ceased and claims that government troops were outside of the home, but they would not enter the city. they also invited germany and turkey -- the accused a ceasefire. >> [unintelligible] the weaponry is heading toward this area. and those on the militia groups have fired at the group. in the shelling is continuous. the army is not taking any action against them. we want to abide with the decision to cease fire. >> he has told the bbc that he expects [unintelligible] >> we have all the major participants in the operations and the diplomatic efforts. i think it would be a good moment to send the signal. the u.s., the u.k., and france has allowed the cease-fire. we have said the conditions. after the summit, and the coming hours, i think we will go to lodge a the military intervention. -- launch a military intervention. >> they continue to attack rebel forces despite the ceasefire. he is now back from where he has
a gallon, suzanne, president obama today renewed his call for a greater focus on u.s. energy independence. >> susie: tom, the president says it's time to "get serious about a long-term policy for secure affordable energy." >> tom: the president issued his blueprint for a secure energy future. it calls for cutting the nation's oil imports by one third by 2025. >> we're going to have to find ways to boost our efficiency so we use less oil. we've got to discover and produce cleaner, renewable sources of energy that also produce less carbon pollution, which is threatening our climate. and we've got to do it quickly. >> tom: the response from the oil industry has been varied. conoco phillips said it was encouraged by the president's call for more domestic oil production, but that it wants to see more specifics. while the former president of shell oil, john hofmeister, says the president's energy plan sounded more like a campaign speech. >> i heard politics as usual, because if there was a seriousness about it, if there was an intent to move forward, i think there would be more than rhetoric. t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)